Insecure Writers Support Group – July 2013


Well, that’s another month gone lol ;)

Today is Insecure Writers Support Group Day where participants get the opportunity to moan and whinge and get a sympathetic virtual shoulder to cry on. Many thanks to Alex Cavanaugh for hosting this wonderful group and please check out the other participants by clicking the ‘insecure writers’ link above :)

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Ok, so where do I begin?

I’ve virtually written nothing this year. I’ve done the odd prompt, tinkered with my novel for Faber, thought about jacking it all in and argued with myself about my motives for being a “writer” and more importantly being published.

And then last week I read this post by the lovely Jo Phillips and if you don’t follow Jo’s blog, 1. Why not? And 2. You really should! ;) Anyway, I could relate so much to what Jo was saying (seriously, go read the post!) but what particularly struck me, hit a nerve, was when she mentioned wanting to do other stuff, other projects. Yes, so do I!!!!! I want to create some art, I want to learn how to draw, I want to make my own clothes and stuff for around my home. I want to bake, I mean really bake (not just the odd cake) and I want to go back into volunteering…or even *shock horror gasp* get a job! (part time of course!).

I’m bored….. Ok, there, I said it! I’ve been at home now for 2 years concentrating on my writing. The Hubster’s suggestion which I totally agreed with at the time, and thank him for (hes always encouraged me to do whatever i want to do). Ooooo, yes, 8 hours a day to concentrate on my writing! But it hasn’t worked out that way. I procrastinate, I faff about, and probably only write for a couple of hours a day anyway, well, ive not even done that this year :(

I talked last month about losing the fun from writing, and reading Jo’s post made me realise that I really need to get a grip. It’s the story of my life really (the Hubster will be shaking his head at this point and saying “here we go again” lol). I’ve spent the best part of 25 years asking myself “what do I want to do when I grow up?” And I thought I’d finally found something I could devote my life to. But perhaps being a published author isn’t it? But what else do I have? There’s nothing I’m good at, and that’s the problem :(

Perhaps I’ll never know, never find it….but in the meantime, there’s no such thing as failure. If you never try, you’ll never know, and it’s all part of the journey, right? I know some if you have been writing since you were children, I haven’t. I caught the bug late in life, so writing was never something I’d really considered as a career choice, until 2010 lol. But perhaps it really is the wrong choice?

I have a book, somewhere in a box that is about finding your life’s calling. I never actually got around to reading it….perhaps I should dig it out lol ;)

Did you know what you wanted to be when you grew up? Do you know what your life calling is now?

Don’t get me wrong, I love writing, but do I really want it as a career?

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64 thoughts on “Insecure Writers Support Group – July 2013

  1. When I was a kid, I wanted so many different careers. I also came to writing late, but if you want it, if you really, really want it, you’ll continue. If not, any one of those other options sounds fulfilling. Good luck with whatever you choose. Great IWSG posting! (This Writer’s Growing on IWSG)

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    • When I was a kid I wanted to be an architect, but it turned out I was useless at Maths lol ;)

      Thanks honey, you’re right, the desire/need will take over if that’s what I was meant to do.

      Xx

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  2. I was going to say that I came to writing late in life as well, but what actually happened was that I abandoned writing (especially writing for publication) when I was younger, and now I’m back. :) I really don’t think that a life should have only one calling, especially a creative one. It’s fun to explore other pursuits, music, art, and helping other people because I think everything you do feeds into everything else.
    I loved Joanne’s post, because it gets to the heart of something that worries me a lot too: What if by pursuing publication I lose this special magic I can do with words, where the world goes away and I can transport myself anywhere I want to be? What if the fun goes out of writing? I know there are lots of published writers who haven’t lost that, so I hang in there, but in the end the writing is what matters most to me. I’m sad to read that it seems Joanne is struggling with that.
    Now, go write something you love–just for fun! You have a wonderful voice and I would hate to see you stop writing.

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      • I don’t mind you asking at all, in fact, way back when no one was reading my blog, I wrote a few posts about this very subject.
        I think it boiled down to that what people told me I ‘should’ write wasn’t what I wanted to write. Because I was young and eager to please I decided to stop and do something else rather than write something that didn’t make me happy. I wrote journals and poetry for myself but never thought I’d pick up writing again.
        Then I decided to write what made ME happy! Now I couldn’t stop if I tried. :)
        Have fun with your words!

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      • Ahhhhh, I see, yes, I gave up on a degree writing course because the next term was to be ALL poetry, and I didn’t want to write poetry, so I know where you’re coming from. Glad you went back to it though :)

        Xx

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  3. faff about. What a great expression! Yes I do also. But I got the writing bug after I retired and while it consumes a great deal of my time, it’s not the only activity I do. (I certainly do not bake). I never knew what I wanted to do when I grow up. And still don’t

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  4. I think this is a very brave post Vicki. I didn’t start writing until 2010 either. Another late bloomer. Maybe if you start a new project and only allow yourself an hour a day to write, you might find your love of it again. I have heard this before. Given more time to do it in doesn’t always work. I have to fit my writing in after work and between family wanting any attention. It may be if you relegate it, the love may come back a little. And you then have new opportunity for trying something else. Life is after all, about experiences. Good luck with whatever you decide!

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    • Thanks Rebecca, it’s something I’ve been thinking about for a while now (I think doing the Faber course didn’t help, or perhaps it did lol).

      I read a quote last night (spooky considering my post that was written at the weekend) from T’S Eliot, he said:

      “I think that for me it’s been very useful to exercise other activities, such as working in a bank, or publishing…the difficulty of not having as much time as I would like has given me greater pressure of concentration.”

      Spot on Mr Eliot, and that quote was in response to an interviewer asking “Do you think that the optimal career for a poet would involve no work at all but writing and reading?”

      Thanks honey :)

      Xx

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  5. You know how I feel about this, Vikki. I love writing, too, and have done since childhood but when I stopped and looked at my motives for writing, recently, and was totally honest with myself, I discovered that I really don’t want writing as a career. I want to always love writing, and I feel that having deadlines to stick to, and writing when I really don’t feel like it, would take some of the joy out of it.

    It took me ages to discover what I wanted to be when I grow up, mainly because I’m interested in so many things. I love hypnotherapy. I really do, and I’m privileged to be able to do it for a living. I love lots of other things as well and I wouldn’t want to change that for anything.

    The truth is, I want to carry on loving everything I do, including writing, and never having to do anything because I feel I’ve got to whether I want to or not.

    It took me a very long time to discover what I wanted to be when I grow up but I have discovered it. When I grow up, I want to be me.

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    • He he he, it’s our chats about it that have got me thinking about it even more ;)

      Awwww, Barbara, that’s wonderful :) But, at some stage I would like to earn some money lol. It felt great when I was working, that I didn’t have to ask The Hubster for money to buy his own Birthday present lol. Perhaps I’m just fed up with being cooped up in doors all the time. There’s only so many days a week I can go and sit in a cafe in my own :(

      Thanks honey xx

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  6. Taking on a new project may be fulfilling for you Vikki but I doubt you can relegate writing to the back burner too much since you obviously love it. Perhaps you just need a little inspiration to get your juices flowing again.

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  7. I still haven’t grown up, Vikki ;) I’ve now ‘retired’ to write and haven’t written a word because I’ve been too busy moving a house. But I know I’ll get around to it soon….

    You said – “There’s nothing I’m good at, and that’s the problem” – never sell yourself short because you are probably good at many things, you just haven’t discovered them yet.

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    • Oh but Dianne, you are an AUTHOR ;) He he he (and a very good one from what I’ve read!).

      Thanks honey, I’ve spent 25 years saying that, and 25 years trying to discover it lol. Perhaps I should just accept that I’ll never find it and move on ;)

      Xx

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  8. I can sympathise with some of that. Whenever I book a day of work to write I faff about doing things that I feel I should be doing rather than actually writing. Although, to be fair, 8 hours in front of a lap top would give me a raging headache, so it’s good I get up sometimes.
    I also think that becasue I do work full time when I do get to write on a regular day it’s like gold dust and I’m more likely to make the most of it. For those of you who have children as well I don’t know how you do it.
    I want to write though, I’ve always wanted to write and have since I was thirteen, it’s only recently that I’ve realised exactly how much it means to me though.

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  9. It sounds like you’re having a second year wobble! When I had the same experience a musician friend said I needed to devote at least a decade to writing before I could expect to enjoy success. I’m now about to start year five and still having ups and downs. But writing has got under my skin (like you I started late in life having feared books and reading as a child) and I can’t imagine another sort of life. Keep at it! You’ve learnt so much. Get a part time job as a distraction!

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    • Thanks Gail :)

      There was that study wasn’t there, some psychologist said that to be good at anything you have to have done 10,000 hours studying it. Hmmmmm, I think I’m only about 3,000 into that ;)

      Yes, I think you’re right, I need a job lol

      Xx

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  10. How about trying this out for fun. Only let yourself have 30 minutes of writing time, every other day for a week, you must fill your other 7.5 hours with non writing stuff, but you can plan your writing in your head only. see if a very short limited time brings something to the table. I’m a terrible faffer too! Put the writing aside, don’t feel guilty, but go live your life!

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  11. Please delete the bit where you say you are no good at writing! Nonsense and piffle! You need a proper break and you need, like you say, to discover some other passions – you are such a people person, the volunteering sounds like a good idea. Looking forward to seeing you Monday xx

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    • Ha ha ha, major self confidence issues Anita ;)

      Perhaps you’ve hot the nail on the head. I NEED to be around people, and 2 years of sitting at home, on my own, every single day is not good for me. Perhaps it’s just that I need some mental stimulation?

      Thanks honey, yes, see you Monday! :)

      Xx

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  12. Although I didn’t start until I was in my mid 30s I now know writing is what I want to do. It’s not the only thing I want to do though and I feel it’s important to have other interests besides the writing.

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  13. I’ve never known what I wanted to do when I grow up, thank god I’m still try to lol, I have say, I loved writing my journal, but when it came to turning it into an interesting mixed blog, it has sort of taken the shine off. Not sure I could ever write a book, but we can still keep trying while trying other things ;) x

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  14. Pingback: Insecure Writers’ Support Group Day – Focusing On Support! | Joanne Phillips - a writer's journey

  15. Thanks so much for the mention, Vikki. Yes, I was in a dark place last week, but I’m feeling a lot better now. I think it’s perfectly possible – and totally acceptable – to get bored even doing something you love. You should follow your heart and start other projects (is there time to get your money back on the Writers’ Bureau course? I think that course is a bit basic for a Faber graduate, to be honest) ;) This month’s IWSG post on my blog is dedicated to you, hope you find it useful, love Jo xxx
    http://joannegphillips.wordpress.com/2013/07/03/insecure-writers-support-group-day-focusing-on-support/

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    • Thanks Jo, and you are very welcome. I hope you’ve managed to decide exactly what you want to do, and where you want to be :)

      I think I decided to sign up for the Writers Bureau course to help me focus, I’m still hoping that will be the case lol

      Thank you so much Jo :)

      Xx

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  16. How did I miss this post? It’s something that I can so relate to! I had a lot more time on my hands last year when we first moved to the Geneva area, because nobody knew me here, I had no business contacts and so I had no work (I work freelance as a consultant and facilitator). But did I use that time for my writing? Only in a very small measure. So then I started to feel guilty and really flagellate myself: how serious are you about writing really? when will you stop finding excuses? And the ironic thing is, I still didn’t go out and explore my new surroundings or have a good time pursuing other interests, because… well, I just felt too guilty about it.
    Miserable sod that I am!
    Of course now I am so busy with (paid) work that I would give anything to have a bit more time for writing. So, with hindsight, I would say enjoy leisure when you can grab it with both hands, don’t force the writing (and certainly don’t feel guilty about it) and, as all the other comments suggest, find your zest again by trying out new things. I am sure your enjoyment of writing will come back.

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  17. I can’t write with loads of empty time looming in front of me, as others have said. It’s too scary. When I was working full time and even part time I would regularly dive headlong into it. If I have a week off I sit there worrying about money and when I’m next going to get work and all the jobs that need doing around the house and end up doing nothing. I love Joanne Phillips’ square analogy. Very true.

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  18. Love this post. I started writing a year ago, but only thought of it as passion for a few months before that. I never thought I would be a writer. So, I kind of get where your coming from. I’ve always said to myself, if I had the opportunity to just concentrate on writing, how great would that be, but I imagine I would feel similar to you after two years. There is something about the limited time I have to write that I never have the opportunity to get burned out or tired of it. I am into a lot of other stuff and I feel guilty that I don’t give it up and that I should be writing, but maybe the grass isn’t always greener on the other side. You will figure it out.

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    • Ha ha ha, exactly Sydney! Oh, don’t get me wrong, there are probably people out there who, if they gave up work for 2 years would have come up with 2 novels by now, possibly have been subbing to agents/publishers and having a whale of a time….but, perhaps there’s more to the way I feel. As 1233a said above (who knows me in real life) I AM a people person, perhaps it’s not that I’m bored, perhaps I’m lonely?

      Oh, spot on, the grass DEFINITELY isn’t always greener ;)

      Thanks honey xx

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  19. Firstly, let me just say that there are a great many things you are good at. Just from what I know of you in the short time since we met I can see that you are:

    A great social networker
    A brilliant supporter of others
    An awesome blogger – that A-Z challenge was a thing of beauty, not to mention the blood, sweat and tears ;-)
    A great mum – your kids don’t want to leave home, proof enough!
    A wonderful wife – not many people make it to the 25 year mark these days and your pictures for your recent anniversary celebration just prove that
    A fantastic coffee shop ‘date’!

    Those are just the talents that everyone can see you have got and who knows what other hidden depths you have? So you’ve tried for 25 years to find ‘the thing’… Maybe there is not just one thing, but a ton of them (see start of list above, to be added to and then at least doubled in the next 25 years).

    I think you are right though that having other outlets both takes the pressure off from feeling you have to dedicate your life to it and allows you to focus on it when you *want* to instead, turning it back into one of the many things you can enjoy just for the hell of it. I am a firm believer that no one person can give you everything you need. Husbands are great (on the whole!), but you still need friends and others to enrich your life. So why shouldn’t it be the same with activities, hobbies, vocations, passions, whatever you want to call them?

    Jo xx

    p.s. You can bake me a cake whenever you like :-)

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    • Ha ha ha, oh Jo, you know how to make me blush, and giggle…thank you :)

      Ok, so how do I find those hidden depths? Lol

      Seriously, thank you, yes, I’ve decided that I need to do other things, I’ve decided that I need to get out and about more, away from the “job” because that’s what writing has become, and I’m not even being paid! ;)

      Have a lovely time at the conference (so jealous!) but fingers crossed, I may have some good news re Whit when you get back, and THEN you’ll be able to visit for tea and cake :)

      Xx

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  20. Dear lovely Vikki, writing doesn’t have to be all or nothing! It’s heart-breaking when writing stops being fun, so combine it with some other stuff! Have baking days and writing days – sew cushions, learn machine embroidery – whatever ticks your boxes! I do celebration cakes for people, have a part time (28 hrs a week) job and still write and get published. Make it fit with you. The more people I talk to, the more I realise it’s a slow process and involves lots of false starts and continual learning. You could try giving it up and see if you can – that would be the true test. Your Writer’s Bureau course will set you on track, though, I bet. I have made the money I spent on the course back several times over and I never even finished it! I hope we’re still able to meet over the summer for writerly (and other) chat! I’ll FB message you soon xx

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  21. What a brilliant post, I can certainly relate to the ‘faffing about’ instead of writing, I drive myself mad sometimes. I go to cafes to write, to motivate myself, but I can hardly stay there all day. I do love it though and can’t imagine NOT writing now, I always wanted to be a writer when I grew up, but I was pushing forty before I started properly. I do have a very part-time job in a library that I cling to, and oddly on the mornings I work I somehow manage to fit in an hour’s writing beforehand! God knows what that says about me…

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    • Thanks Karen :)

      Ha ha ha, you do that too! I did it yesterday, took myself off to the cafe where my writing group meets an hour early, and did actually manage to write *shock horror gasp* lol

      Awwww, that’s great that you always knew it was what you wanted to do….when I was young I wanted to be an architect lol

      Ahhhhh, now what that says is that you have a passion for your writing, and how brilliant is THAT, working part time in a library, I’d LOVE that :)

      Thanks honey, keep it up, it sounds like you have a good balance :)

      Xx

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  22. I’ve been writing since I was 7. I’ll be writing until the day I die. It’s part of my life and it’s what I really would like to do full time. But I have debts, so I have a full time job that I can’t leave until the debts are paid (viscious circle there).
    Mind you, if I suddenly came into a windfall, I wouldn’t be writing for 8 hours straight every day. I have my mom. Since Dad passed, I feel the time I get to spend with her is more important than ever. Breakies and jigsaw puzzles would take up the morning (after walking the dog).
    I think that I like the idea of writing spints more than sitting on my duff for hours on end. So the afternoons would kind of go like this: Sprint. Get up and do a little housework. Sprint. Get up and do some weeding (the most gardening I can manage). Sprint. Break for supper. Sprint. Get up and stretch, then tackle the evening SoMe. Get up, do some tidying. Sprint. Continue until bed calls. I’d probably get 8 hours of work done that way and still feel like I have some kind of life ;) There’s television (I have a few shows I like) and getting out with friends (which you have to make time for), but I find the idea of tackling the writing task in focused bits very attractive. I might even fit in a workout of some kind (!).
    The thing is that you have to make your writing life work for you. If you’re a slave to your writing, it stops being all the things you need it to be (fun, fulfilling) and turns into a chore. My creative self took a beating from various negative situations when I was young, and it took me years to a) realize that I couldn’t NOT write and b) to figure out a way to write that worked for me in my life. It’s a constant struggle to balance everything. Pick your battles, but if you choose to throw in the towel, I wouldn’t be surprised if you’re not itching to get back at it in six months. It’s part of being a writer, the addiction to words and stories, and the need to get it out on the page. Wish you all the best, whatever you decide.

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    • Thanks Melanie :)

      Ahhhhh, yes, I think you’ve hit the nail on the head….I’ve become a *slave* to my writing, and the fact that I gave up work to (supposedly) pursue the dream of being an author, well, that’s my viscous circle….I end up feeling incredibly guilty if I’m not devoting every spare hour to that goal….does that make sense?

      I’m also VERY aware that I’m not contributing to the household income, and that gets me down, as does not having my own money *sighs*

      Thanks honey, I have lots to think about :)

      Xx

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  23. I’ve decided I’m not dedicated to my writing. If I get to serious about it, I get anxious and want to ditch it all. This has to be “play time”, a serious hobby and nothing more because I’ll obsess about it. I’ll still write, but publishing may be something I just let go. And I always thought medicine was a calling, but there are days I just want to disconnect this call.

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    • Oh I can totally relate to that CC :)

      I read yesterday about the difference between an obsession and a passion, and I think my passion has turned into an obsession :(

      (((((Hugs))))) honey xx

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  24. Some interesting thoughts. I only in a round about way knew what I wanted to do when I was a teen. I wanted to do something with children(I’d always enjoyed babysitting) and my husband wanted me to have some way to support myself should anything ever happen to him. I went to nursing school and discovered I didn’t like pediatrics for several reasons. I ended up being a postpartum/newborn nurse for over 17 years. Somewhere after having my daughter I discovered midwifery and fell in love with it. I apprenticed, became a midwife, and practiced independently for 3 years. After leaving midwifery, I went back into nursing, but did home health. I loved midwifery, but had increasing family health needs not conducive to being on call 24/7. Some of my dream goals for the work part of my life would be to become an herbalist or aromatherapist, write, craft, and maybe a diversified small farm home business(sell eggs, honey, herbs, flowers, vegetables). The main thing I know is I want creative freedom and don’t want 9-5 full time employment.

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  25. Ah, Vikki – there’s proof in all of the comments left here that you are good at ONE thing (at least) and that’s blogging…Whatever happens, please don’t stop blogging: I really enjoy your posts and they often get me thinking.

    Writing as a career is something that I have considered, but totally reject. I couldn’t do it to earn money, nor could I dedicate my working hours to it. I work part time and without this contact and link to the rest of the ‘real’ (vs cyber) world I don’t think I’d stay sane. I want to enjoy the process, and while I set goals for myself and fancy the end result to be publication this is more about accomplishing something which I set out to do, rather than build a career upon it.

    As for a life calling – I think this is totally different to a career. A life’s calling is more related to values and morals and whether you are living a life you are proud that utilises your strenghts as a person. You, Vikki, are a great supporter and rally us all on when we need it. This is part of your calling perhaps.

    As for what I wanted to be when I grew up – I wanted to be a writer. And, hey, look at that – I am! :) But, saying that, I don’t feel at all grown up – even at 30 – so really this is a question better phrased as ‘What do I want to be in ten years time?’ And then, ask it again in ten years time…we all want to keep challenging ourselves, better ourselves, make the effort to live our dreams. Only, sometimes, are dreams aren’t all that we hoped they would be because reality gets in the way.

    Good luck with your musings about life and your next steps. don’t stop writing – because I think you’d miss it – but try out a few other things too. And let us know how you’re getting on ;)

    Take Care, Cat xx

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    • Thanks Cat *blush* ;) I won’t stop blogging he he he.

      Yes yes yes! That’s EXACTLY it! Perhaps I am actually going insane lol….seriously, perhaps that’s all it boils down to, lack of contact with the “real world” because I’ve just cooped myself up for too long.

      Thank you so much honey, I think you are right. I should stop beating myself up about not having a calling and just TRY to challenge myself :)

      Xx

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  26. Thanks for the nudge towards Jo’s blog. I often wonder exactly why I’m doing the writing thing. I’ve only been doing it for about three years, and have a full time job and a family so things can get pretty hectic. I enjoy it though, so that’s been enough for me so far.
    It’s hard when you’ve put so much effort into something and you start to question it all and whether you should continue. It’s even harder when you don’t fully understand the reasons for your doubts yourself.
    I’m sure with a shift in focus, working on something for fun to see where it takes you will help you with whatever you decide to do.
    Good luck!

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  27. I’m a bit late with my comment here Vikki…knew it would bring a huge response though. Have been thinking about what you wrote and the journey you have been on recently, which you have shared with us so honestly and generously. Of course the irony is that you ARE a successful writer and communicator through your blogs no matter what other writing you do. I can’t give you much advice. I really consider myself a story teller rather than a ‘writer’ and could never be a successful novelist. I will say that life is too short to spend time doing something you don’t enjoy. I get the feeling that you enjoy blogging…I hate that word really… its writing! And so many people enjoy reading your work. Doesn’t make money I know, not that any writing does! lol

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    • Thanks Pauline :)

      Yes, I do enjoy blogging, but that’s probably because I look on it as “chatting” lol….and I do love to chat ;)

      Some money in my pocket would be REALLY handy though lol

      Xx

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  28. Been there lots of times. Oh, boy, couldn’t I identify with you!

    I didn’t get the novel-writing bug until the age of 36, after achieving an A-grade for AS English at nightschool, and full marks for the short story I did for the creative writing part of the exam.

    As a child, let me see — what did I want to do? Lots of things because I was a passable all-rounder without any defining talent. Here are some of them. Meteorologist, artist, poet, famous pianist, doctor, vet, astronaut, wife of Christian Barnard (the famous heart surgeon), girlfriend of Roger Daltrey (The Who), orator extraordinaire (I’m crud at making speeches), wise guru sitting on a hill dispensing wisdom. At the end of all that, I ended up getting expelled from school, working first as as a kennel maid, then a medical secretary, then as a psychiatric nurse, after which I had children and childminded. The writing was always there, and apparently I have the line of fame on my palm, so who knows?

    Writing 8 hours a day doesn’t work, unless you can pay someone else to clean house and cook. Even saying that, it’s terrible for your health. Also, in my experience, the more time available to write, the less you’ll achieve. Sometimes my hubster has to literally drag me from the computer to do music (which we just about scrape a living from) and to get out into the fresh air to the allotment or the garden. And, of course, my dog wouldn’t let me off taking her for a daily walk. But this is all good, otherwise I would become reclusive and stale in my writing, apart from having very bad backache and even worse eyesight than I already have.

    Don’t give up. Take a rest. A week. A month. A whole year. My longest rest was two years. But it’s those who persevere, who finally make it. Remember what they say (not sure who “they” are!) “There is no such thing as an overnight success”. I’ve just read a novel by someone who’s finally made it with his fifth novel (how hopeful I am, as I’m on my fifth just now). His book was excellent and has won him the Hugo and Nebula Awards, plus four other equally prestigious awards.

    Keep at it. You can write. Just don’t beat yourself up about it. Phew. I’ve just written a guest post on your blog, without being invited ;-)

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    • Wow, thanks Sarah :)

      I don’t know if you saw but I said recently that I feel I’m a mere “toddler” when it comes to writing, I have a LONG way to go :) But I’ve been so he’ll bent on learning and growing that I lost my direction and my head became scrambled.

      Yes, I will take a break, I’ve got a few things coming up over the next month or so that will mean I will HAVE to take a break, so I’m seeing that as a positive thing, not a negative one :)

      Thanks again honey, and you can be an uninvited blog guest any time you like ;)

      Xx

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      • When I’ve had breaks from writing, I’ve upped my reading, trying to read from a broad spectrum of novels. It’s really helps one own writing to do this, as long it doesn’t encourage the thinking that everybody else’s stuff is so much better than your own. It won’t be. Some people who are less good at writing are just in the right place at the right time.

        Apart from novels, there’s one really good non-fiction book I love, and that’s Stephen King’s “On Writing”. Have a read of this, if you haven’t already. He has a brilliant attitude towards his creativity.

        Enjoy your break.

        xx

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  29. There are so many other ways to be creative besides writing. Follow whatever moves you. I’m both an author and a musician, and at the moment, it’s the music that calls. And that’s all right.

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  30. Pingback: Insecure Writers Support Group August 2013 | The View Outside

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